0191 516 2002

Salamander Pumps FAQs

Do you have a question about a new pump installation or an exisitng shower pump? 

Browse through our shower pump FAQs below to see if we have the solution for your problem. You will find information on both the noise of showers pumps and installation issues, with supporting video content. 

If you still have issues after looking through the queries, do not hesitate to contact us  on 0191 5162002 and our friendly technical support team will be waiting to assist.

 

Noisy Pump

The pump is very noisy. What could be the problem & how can I reduce the noise?

Salamander Pumps water pumps are designed for quiet, smooth running. There is no such thing as a silent pump, but we come close. If you are experiencing noise problems, then use your installation instructions and check the following:


• The pump is positioned as close to its source of water as possible (e.g. Hot Water Cylinder).
• It has been correctly piped, using the right flanged connection to the hot water cylinder.
• The pump AV couplers are not bent or strained in any way.
• The pump does not sit on bare floor boarding or shelving.
• The pipe work is secured to the wall, not pushing down on the pump.
• Too many elbow fittings in the supply pipe work to the pump will cause resistance (machine bent pipes have virtually no resistance).
• All isolating valves are fully open and are a non-restrictive type e.g. Gate Valves.

In addition to the above, mounting the pump on a paving material, which rests on top of carpet, is a good way of stopping transference of motor vibration into the fabric of the building.
 

How can I ensure that my shower pump is quiet?

The vast majority of our shower pumps have been awarded the Quiet Mark, recognising that they are some of the quietest pumps available in the UK. However there are some additional installation steps you can take to ensure that the pump is as quiet as possible.

Firstly, install a pump mat. The pump mat will reduce the vibration that is passed down from the pump and onto the surface the pump is sitting on. Next you can ensure that the feet are fitted to the pump. All Salamander pumps come with feet, they will further reduce the vibration that is passed down onto the surface the pump is sitting on. Keep AV hoses straight. Hoses are able to flex, but we require that they aren’t bent more than 35°. It is important that there is no excess strain on them. Ensuring that the pipework is secure and clipped will reduce the vibrations transferring from the pump to the pipework. Finally, fit a flange. Flanges ensure that the water drawn from the hot water cylinder has minimal air in it, this is important as air makes the pump noisy. Reducing the amount of air entering the pump will help to keep the pump quiet.

Click here to watch our video on shower pump noise

The pump is making a humming or buzzing noise. What could be the problem?

This can be because the pump is seized up. A pump will seize because of high temperature water. Salamander guidelines say that the water should be no higher than 65C in the hot water cylinder, if the water is any higher than this then some of the components of the pump can be damaged. High temperatures cause the shaft seals to stick together, which prevents the motor from turning, causing a buzzing noise.

Aeration can also cause a buzzing noise. Aeration happens for many reasons, including when a flange hasn’t been fitted when one is required, or pumps not having their own dedicated feeds. When air is dragged through a pump this damages the shaft seals and causes them to stick together, and again will result in the pump being seized and a buzzing noise.

Click here to watch our video on shower pump noise

If your pump is making an unusual noise then get in touch with our technical team on 0191 516 2002.

The pump is making a gravelly or grinding noise. What could be the problem?

This is caused by severe aeration. Air is the enemy of pumps, so it is important that no air gets dragged through the pump, the easiest way to achieve this is to fit a flange. A flange draws water from deeper within the hot water cylinder, where the water contains less air, and supplies this anti-aerated water to the pump. This helps to prevent damage to the pump.

Click here to watch our video on shower pump noise

If your pump is making an unusual noise then get in touch with our technical team on 0191 516 2002.

The pump is making a rattling noise. What could be the problem?

A rattling noise occurs when the pipework supplying the pump isn’t secured. Using the anti-vibration hoses supplied with the pump will help to stop the rattling noise. Salamander Pumps suggest that you keep the hoses as straight as possible and that they aren’t bent any more than 35°. Ensuring that the pipework to the pump is clipped onto a strong surface will stop any vibration from the pump being transferred to the pipework.

Click here to watch our video on shower pump noise

If your pump is making an unusual noise then get in touch with our technical team on 0191 516 2002.

The pump is making an intermittent noise. What could be the problem?

If your pump is starting up on its own, and you are experiencing an intermittent noise, this is most likely because there is a leak in the system and you have a negative head pump. A negative head pump recognises a pressure drops within the system. If there is a leak in the system, and it continually drips, it drops the flow pressure of the system which causes a negative head pump to kick in sometimes.

The easiest way to test if this is a pump issue or a system issue, is to isolate all the outlet hoses on the isolation points and then leave the pump overnight. If it doesn’t kick in overnight then you will have a leak in the system which is causing the pump to start to work.

Click here to watch our video on shower pump noise

If your pump is making an unusual noise then get in touch with our technical team on 0191 516 2002.

Broken Pump

My pump has developed a leak, how can I resolve this?

First find out if the leak is from the pump, the hose(s), running down the pipe or from above the pump.

If the hose is leaking, you could fit a new hose or washer depending on the nature of the leak. When then pump is leaking, it’s useful to find out where from; quite often this can be from the body O-ring or shaft seal. With some of our pumps, a kit can be purchased that will allow you to repair the pump. However, it’s best to call for technical support first. If the pump is under warranty, please do not open up the pump or tamper with it in anyway, as this will invalidate your warranty. Please contact our PumpWise Technical Support Team first.
 

The pump is turning on and off. What could be wrong & how can I fix it?

Usually when a positive head pump begins to turn on and off during use, it is down to the natural flow of water running through the pump. The flow switches require a minimum of 1LTR/30SECS to activate them, so it’s worth checking this. You can also test the pump by attaching a couple of washing machine hoses to the outlets of the pump and activating the pump into a bucket and see if it works.

The pump is running but is not pumping any water

If it’s a positive head pump, it may be that there is damage to one or more of the impellers. If it’s a negative head pump, there may be a restriction or blocked filter on the pump or damage to an impeller.

The pump will not start. What can I do?

This depends on the pump type. 
For positive head pumps:
• Check the fuse/breaker.
• Check the flow through the outlets and ensure there is a minimum flow rate of 1LTR/30SECS running naturally through the outlet. A quick way to test the pump would be to attach a couple of washing machine hoses to the outlets of the pump and activating the pump into a bucket and see if it works.
• Another test that can briefly be performed would be to remove the pump from situ, plug it in somewhere we know works and turn the pump upside down – if it starts, we know the pump is ok and can be turned immediately back the correct way where it should stop.

For negative head pumps:
• Check the fuse/breaker.
• Ensure the pump is in the correct mode.

How do I deal with air in the system?

Air is the enemy of all shower pumps and if trapped around the impellers, can seriously impair performance and eventually lead to pump failure. The hot connections to the cylinder and the shower pump must allow any air in the system to filter up to the vent and away from the hot shower pump inlet. The alternative to help combat this problem is to fit a flange on top of the hot water cylinder. (Many of our pumps will require a flange to be fitted. Please refer to the pumps’ warranty installation guide handbook prior to installation)

The pump keeps blowing the fuse or tripping the breaker. What should I do?

Unfortunately, this tends to mean the pump is failing to turn so further investigation would be required. If the drive shaft turns freely, it may be worth trying to replace the capacitor. Check for damage around impellers and anything that could stop the rotation of them.

My shower works fine on one setting, such as hot or cold, but when mixed its pulses on and off. How can I resolve this?

Usually when a positive head pump begins to turn on and off during use, this is down to the natural flow of water running through the pump. The flow switches require a minimum of 1 litre in 30 seconds to activate through the outlet, so it’s worth checking this. You can also test the pump by attaching a couple of washing machine hoses to the outlets of the pump and activating the pump into a bucket and see if it works ok.

The pump is delaying in activation? What could be the cause of this?

If this is a positive head pump, a delay usually suggests that there is not enough natural flow to allow the pump to initiate. Check the natural flow of water to make sure it is over the minimum required.  The low flow could be down to a blockage on the filters, shower head, twisted shower hose or possibly some negative head.

If a negative head pump is installed, check the pump is in the correct mode of operation and that there are no restrictions after the pump causing the pressure drop to be sensed slowly.
 

There appears to be no or significantly reduced pressure to my shower. What can I do?

If the pump is activating and there is low or no pressure at the shower, you would need to check for restrictions in the pumps filters, shower head, hose etc.

Check the flow through the outlets and ensure there is a minimum flow rate of 1LTR/30SECS running naturally through the outlet. A quick way to test the pump would be to attach a couple of washing machine hoses to the outlets of the pump and activating the pump into a bucket and see if it works.
 

My pump remains on even when the shower is switched off. What could be the reason for this?

For positive head pumps, isolate the outlets coming from the pump – if the pump stops, the water is going somewhere it shouldn’t be in the system. Therefore, check things like the vent pipe and make sure it’s not filling the cold water tank up for example.

If using a negative head pump, first do an isolation test on the pump. Once reset, isolate the outlets of the pump and see if the pump continues to hunt. If the pump remains turned off, then it’s usually a small pressure drop in the system after the pump. If it continues to hunt, then it would be worth checking the pressure on the pressure vessel with the pump uninstalled.
 

WEEE Compliance

Are Salamander Pumps WEEE Compliant?

Yes...Salamander Pumps have been compliant since the 1st January 2019.

The WEEE Regulations 2013 (as amended), came into force from 1st January 2014.

Its primary purpose is the prevention of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) and requires the re-use, recycling and recovery of such waste, so as to reduce its disposal to landfill or incineration. All electrical and electronic waste must be stored, collected, treated, recycled and disposed of separately from other waste.

The products of Salamander Pumped Shower Systems came into scope of this directive on Jan 1st 2019. Salamander are committed to recycling and to the reduction of electrical waste and registered as an EEE producer under registration number WEEE/MM5397AA.

Disposal of Salamander products with the crossed out wheelie bin symbol.

Salamander fully endorses the environmental objectives of the WEEE Directive and electronic products are labelled with the wheelie bin symbol, to alert our customers to the fact these products should not be disposed of with general refuse, i.e. in a landfill site, or with household waste. All electronic products showing the wheelie bin symbol should sent to approved operators for safe disposal or recycling. 

Flanges

What is a flange?

A flange is a device that limits the amount of air entering a pump from the hot water cylinder. When water is heated, or replaced within the hot water cylinder, air bubbles are formed and collect around the side or the top of the cylinder. The bubbles then rise up to the top of the vent and expansion pipe. By installing a flange, these air bubbles are prevented from entering the pump, as the flange is able to draw water from deeper within the hot water cylinder.

Why is a flange so important?

Flanges are crucial in ensuring longevity of life and quiet running for the pump. In fact, some Salamander pumps require a flange to ensure a valid warranty.

Having an aerated supply of water to a pump, showers and other outlets can cause a whole host of problems, including unnecessary, and perhaps sudden, fluctuations in temperature, increased noise levels, accelerated degrading of the pump’s internal workings, which can lead to an eventual leak, and a premature breakdown of the pump.

Whilst some warranties require a flange to be fitted, in some installations, regenerative pumps (for example, the Salamander CT range) do not necessarily need a flange, provided that the pump is installed at the base of the hot water cylinder, the cold-water tank is higher than 1.2m above the hot water cylinder, and the pump is ‘teed’ off the first downward leg from the cylinder. This is because the pumps are designed to limit the aeration going to the pump and avoids the need for a flange.

However, in general, the best option for all pumps is to fit an anti-aeration flange to the hot water cylinder, so that a dedicated supply feed can connect the flange directly to the hot inlet on the pump.

Which flange is the right for my installation?

There are various flanges available for a shower pump installation, including a Surrey Flange (such as Salamander ‘S’ Flange), a Warix Flange, and a Non-Stop Essex Flange. Therefore, it’s important to check the fitting guide ahead of installation to ensure an appropriate flange is installed.

The Surrey and Warix flanges are both top entry flanges, meaning that they screw onto the hot draw off connection on the dome of standard type hot water cylinder.

In comparison, the Non-Stop Essex flange is a side entry flange, which requires drilling into the side of the cylinder. This flange is best for when a pump needs to be situated above the hot water cylinder.

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